14 September 2006

Call for global action against international financial institutions

At the 2nd South-North International Consultation on Resistance and Alternatives to Debt Domination, representatives of movements and organizations from more than 50 countries agreed on four joint initiatives for the coming years. One of these joint initiatives is the Call for International Actions Against the IFIs in 2006. The initiative was subsequently adopted by the Assembly of Social Movements, gathered in Caracas, Venezuela, in the VI World Social Forum (polycentric) in January, 2006,

The following is a sign-on statement that expresses a critique of the role and operations of international financial institutions and calls on social movements, people’s organizations, NGOs, citizens groups, community organizations, trade unions and working class organizations, and political movements to wage a concerted campaign against the IFIs on a common platform, and organize coordinated mobilizations in as many countries as possible leading up to and culminating during the week of the Annual Meetings in September 2006.

We invite your organization to sign on to the statement, circulate it to all networks and groups that you can reach, and participate actively in implementing the call.

1. Immediate and 100% cancellation of multilateral debts as part of the total cancellation of debts claimed from the South, without externally imposed conditionalities.

2. Open, transparent and participatory External Audit of the lending operations and related policies of the International Financial Institutions, beginning with the World Bank World Bank
WB
The World Bank was founded as part of the new international monetary system set up at Bretton Woods in 1944. Its capital is provided by member states’ contributions and loans on the international money markets. It financed public and private projects in Third World and East European countries.

It consists of several closely associated institutions, among which :

1. The International Bank for Reconstruction and Development (IBRD, 189 members in 2017), which provides loans in productive sectors such as farming or energy ;

2. The International Development Association (IDA, 159 members in 1997), which provides less advanced countries with long-term loans (35-40 years) at very low interest (1%) ;

3. The International Finance Corporation (IFC), which provides both loan and equity finance for business ventures in developing countries.

As Third World Debt gets worse, the World Bank (along with the IMF) tends to adopt a macro-economic perspective. For instance, it enforces adjustment policies that are intended to balance heavily indebted countries’ payments. The World Bank advises those countries that have to undergo the IMF’s therapy on such matters as how to reduce budget deficits, round up savings, enduce foreign investors to settle within their borders, or free prices and exchange rates.

and IMF IMF
International Monetary Fund
Along with the World Bank, the IMF was founded on the day the Bretton Woods Agreements were signed. Its first mission was to support the new system of standard exchange rates.

When the Bretton Wood fixed rates system came to an end in 1971, the main function of the IMF became that of being both policeman and fireman for global capital: it acts as policeman when it enforces its Structural Adjustment Policies and as fireman when it steps in to help out governments in risk of defaulting on debt repayments.

As for the World Bank, a weighted voting system operates: depending on the amount paid as contribution by each member state. 85% of the votes is required to modify the IMF Charter (which means that the USA with 17,68% % of the votes has a de facto veto on any change).

The institution is dominated by five countries: the United States (16,74%), Japan (6,23%), Germany (5,81%), France (4,29%) and the UK (4,29%).
The other 183 member countries are divided into groups led by one country. The most important one (6,57% of the votes) is led by Belgium. The least important group of countries (1,55% of the votes) is led by Gabon and brings together African countries.

http://imf.org
.

3. Stop the imposition of conditions and the promotion of neoliberal policies and projects.

a. In this 50th anniversary year of the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the IFIs end the promotion of privatization of public services and the use of public resources to support private profits.

b. Stop IFI funding and involvement in environmentally destructive projects beginning with big dams, oil, gas and mining and implement the major recommendations of the Extractive Industries Review.

c. Immediately stop imposing conditions that exacerbate health crises like the AIDS pandemic and make restitution for past practices such as requiring user fees for public education and health care services.

For more than sixty years, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank together with their partner regional development banks and export credit agencies, have used international finance capital to exercise control and restructure the societies of the South to serve the interests of global private corporations and the economic and geo-political agenda of the few powerful nations that control these institutions.
The resulting effects on people’s lives, on communities, on the environment, and on the economic as well as political structures in the South have been profound and over the years have generated numerous resistance struggles against these institutions.

Despite well-documented evidence and countless testimonies to the destruction, displacement and dispossession their policies and operations have caused, these institutions persist in legitimizing their role. In recent years they have declared themselves to be champions of “poverty reduction” and “good governance.”

This year, 2006, we pledge to intensify our struggles against these institutions and raise the level of international coordination and concerted action. In particular, we commit to organizing different forms of mobilization and direct action in many countries across the globe during the week of the IMF and WB Annual Meetings, September 14-20, 2006. This will include various activities and actions in the vicinity of their meetings in Singapore.

WE CALL on all people’s organizations, social movements, labor movements, women’s movements, farmers groups, first peoples, religious and cultural groups, community organizations, NGOs, political forces, and all concerned citizens around the world to join us in mounting vigorous actions that will focus the world’s attention on the destruction and human rights violations caused by the IMF and World Bank, the regional development banks, export credit agencies, and the neoliberal global system they enforce.

Our actions will identify issues and articulate demands that reflect the particular impacts of these institutions on each of our countries but will also be united on the following global demands:

1. Immediate and 100% cancellation of multilateral debts as part of the total cancellation of debts claimed from the South, without externally imposed conditionalities.

The inhuman and destructive consequences of debt domination which the international financial institutions play a major part in perpetuating are evidence against the outrageously deceitful claim of these institutions that they are working for “poverty reduction” and “financing for development.”

Debt relief initiatives of international financial institutions have to date covered only a very small part of the debt claimed from the South. Worse, these initiatives come with conditions that undermine the sovereignty of people to determine their own path of development, have proven harmful to livelihoods and the environment, and keep South economies tied to the interests of global private profit Profit The positive gain yielded from a company’s activity. Net profit is profit after tax. Distributable profit is the part of the net profit which can be distributed to the shareholders. .

Cancellation of only a small part of the debt may release some funds that can be used for basic services but does not free the South from debt bondage. Debt cancellation must be 100%.

And for immediate action, we highlight the especially urgent cases - most of Africa, Haiti, Nepal, Tsunami-hit countries and others recently devastated by natural calamities, countries ravaged by war, societies overwhelmed by HIV/AIDS, and others experiencing severe social, financial and economic crisis.

We reject the international financial institutions’ “debt sustainability” framework. There is no level of debt that is “sustainable” in a global economic system that is founded on domination and exploitation of the peoples, economies and resources of the South. This framework is a means by which these institutions justify maintaining the “indebtedness” of Southern countries.

The insistence on their “debt sustainability framework” is also a refusal to address the more fundamental question of the illegitimacy of the debt claimed from the South. Peoples of the South should not be made to pay for illegitimate debts — debts they have not benefited from, debts that financed projects that have caused displacement of communities and damage to the environment, debts wasted on corruption or failed projects, debts contracted through undemocratic and fraudulent means, debts with grossly unfair terms and harmful conditions, odious debts incurred by dictatorships, debt contracted in the context of exploitative international economic relations, debts for which peoples of the South have paid many times over.

Though the financial debts claimed from the South are of staggering amounts, totaling more than US$2.3 trillion dollars, the North in fact owes the peoples of the South a far, far greater debt. It is the historical, economic, social, and ecological debt accumulated over centuries of plunder and exploitation by North with the collaboration of Southern elites.

The IMF and the World Bank should bear the costs of writing off debts owed to them by using the World Bank’s loan loss provisions (valued at US$3 billion as of June 30, 2005) and retained earnings (valued at US$27 billion as of June 30, 2005) and IMF gold stocks. With the market price of gold surpassing US$600 an ounce, the IMF’s 103.4 million ounces of gold are worth more than US$60 billion, rather than the US$9 billion recorded on the IMF’s books.

2. Open, transparent and participatory External Audit of the lending operations and related policies of the International Financial Institutions, beginning with the World Bank and IMF

Debt campaigns, movements, people’s organizations, and NGOs are now involved in preparing for and conducting country-level independent Citizens’ Audits of Debts claimed from South countries as well as calling on South governments to conduct transparent, open and participatory Government Audits (e.g. Parliamentary) of these debts. These audits are aimed at examining the origins and causes of the debt problem, taking stock of effects and impacts, bringing to light the dubious and illegitimate character of the debts, identifying responsibility and accountability, and establishing and strengthening the basis for urgent changes in national policies on the debt and related issues.

We challenge the international financial institutions to subject themselves to similar independent audits of the loans they have released, their lending policies, processes and operations, and the terms and conditionalities that have accompanied these loans, and take stock of the effects and impacts. Such audits should look into the culpability and accountability of these international financial institutions, and asses what restitution and reparations must be made.

The international financial institutions have recently been stepping up efforts to portray themselves as champions of good governance, including the announcement of renewed efforts and strategies to fight corruption. We challenge these institutions to begin with themselves and examine how they have been involved in creating and exacerbating the problem of corruption. External, independent audits of their loans, lending operations and conditionalities should include this question. Further, corruption must be seen as a systemic problem that also involves the private sector, especially transnational corporations.

3. Stop the imposition of conditions and the promotion of neoliberal policies and projects.

Through the conditions attached to their loans and programs, the IMF and World Bank have succeeded in restructuring the global economy. The widespread use of “structural adjustment Structural Adjustment Economic policies imposed by the IMF in exchange of new loans or the rescheduling of old loans.

Structural Adjustments policies were enforced in the early 1980 to qualify countries for new loans or for debt rescheduling by the IMF and the World Bank. The requested kind of adjustment aims at ensuring that the country can again service its external debt. Structural adjustment usually combines the following elements : devaluation of the national currency (in order to bring down the prices of exported goods and attract strong currencies), rise in interest rates (in order to attract international capital), reduction of public expenditure (’streamlining’ of public services staff, reduction of budgets devoted to education and the health sector, etc.), massive privatisations, reduction of public subsidies to some companies or products, freezing of salaries (to avoid inflation as a consequence of deflation). These SAPs have not only substantially contributed to higher and higher levels of indebtedness in the affected countries ; they have simultaneously led to higher prices (because of a high VAT rate and of the free market prices) and to a dramatic fall in the income of local populations (as a consequence of rising unemployment and of the dismantling of public services, among other factors).

IMF : http://www.worldbank.org/
programs” from the early 1980s in countries with significant debt, poverty, and financial problems has forced most of the South countries’ economic policies to ape those of the industrialized countries, regardless of how inappropriate those policies may have been for the countries’ development needs. Because of the imposition of neo-liberal policies on countries desperate for access to credit, peoples across the South now confront economies oriented to export production rather than providing for local markets, devastated manufacturing sectors, a large percentage of economic actors in foreign hands, valuable public assets privatized, health and other social sectors crippled by decades of de-funding, environmental resources devastated by over-exploitation, small farms and businesses wiped out by denial of credit and subsidies, and massive unemployment.

Our struggle against debt domination is waged in large part to win freedom from the conditions that indebted governments are blackmailed into accepting. For the September 2006 actions we demand:

a. In this 50th anniversary year of the International Finance Corporation (IFC), the IFIs end the promotion of privatization of public services and the use of public resources to support private profits.

The IMF and especially the World Bank have been the main drivers in the global push for the privatization of basic services. They are joined by other financial institutions like regional development banks and export credit agencies.

The international financial institutions promote privatization of public services through policy conditions and policy advice, financing of projects that pave the way for privatization, providing technical assistance in the preparation of feasibility studies as well as the process of implementation, and even direct support for private companies taking over public utilities. The International Finance Corporation plays a major role in providing risk guarantees Guarantees Acts that provide a creditor with security in complement to the debtor’s commitment. A distinction is made between real guarantees (lien, pledge, mortgage, prior charge) and personal guarantees (surety, aval, letter of intent, independent guarantee). as well as equity Equity The capital put into an enterprise by the shareholders. Not to be confused with ’hard capital’ or ’unsecured debt’. assistance for these private companies, and facilitating government bail-outs of privatized utilities in distress.

The continued emphasis on privatizing basic services such as water provision - or, when no company is interested in purchasing the utility, arranging leases and service contracts - and the “commercialization” of even life-saving agencies such as those managing food reserves reflects a fixation on markets as the only organizing principle for economies even in the face of overwhelming contradictory evidence. Failure after failure of water privatizations in the South has not deterred the IFIs from their mission to wrest assets from public ownership.

Our message to the IFC and its multilateral partners is clear: no more public resources for support of private profit.

b. Stop IFI funding and involvement in environmentally destructive projects beginning with big dams, oil, gas and mining and implement the major recommendations of the Extractive Industries Review.

The international financial institutions are also presenting themselves as leading in the fight against climate change and environmental destruction. However, no amount of clever rhetoric about stronger commitments and new strategies can hide the fact that many projects designed, driven and supported by international financial institutions violate the already watered-down standards and safeguards avowed by these same institutions and cause massive environmental as well as social problems.

The World Bank is itself a major ecological debtor, having funded major projects such as hydro-electric dams, mines, pipelines and petroleum exploration and development projects which have displaced populations and wrought major environmental damage. The World Bank has refused to implement major recommendations of its own Extractive Industries Review including 1) the principle that communities faced with resource extraction projects must give free, prior and informed consent, 2) and the phase out of investment in hydrocarbon extraction projects.

The World Bank’s attempt to claim leadership on the issue of climate change with the application of its development of carbon credit trading Market activities
trading
Buying and selling of financial instruments such as shares, futures, derivatives, options, and warrants conducted in the hope of making a short-term profit.
is another tragic example of market fundamentalism. Entrusting the precarious future of the world’s climate to the World Bank’s clever market solutions distracts the major actors from focusing on the over-consumption that threaten to doom the planet and all who live on it. Meanwhile, the World Bank Group, which claims leadership in developing alternative energy, devotes much greater resources to developing conventional energy sources. Indeed, the World Bank is the world’s leading financer of projects producing greenhouse gases.

c. Immediately stop imposing conditions that exacerbate health crises like the AIDS pandemic and make restitution for past practices such as requiring user fees for public education and health care services.

IFI policies have aggravated health crises like the AIDS pandemic in a number of ways. Austerity measures have constrained health budgets, prevented the hiring of critically needed teachers and health care workers due to limits on spending for public sector employees, and kept people out of clinics and children away from schools by insisting on user fees. The macroeconomic policies the International Financial Institutions have imposed over the last 25 years - including fiscal austerity, high interest rates Interest rates When A lends money to B, B repays the amount lent by A (the capital) as well as a supplementary sum known as interest, so that A has an interest in agreeing to this financial operation. The interest is determined by the interest rate, which may be high or low. To take a very simple example: if A borrows 100 million dollars for 10 years at a fixed interest rate of 5%, the first year he will repay a tenth of the capital initially borrowed (10 million dollars) plus 5% of the capital owed, i.e. 5 million dollars, that is a total of 15 million dollars. In the second year, he will again repay 10% of the capital borrowed, but the 5% now only applies to the remaining 90 million dollars still due, i.e. 4.5 million dollars, or a total of 14.5 million dollars. And so on, until the tenth year when he will repay the last 10 million dollars, plus 5% of that remaining 10 million dollars, i.e. 0.5 million dollars, giving a total of 10.5 million dollars. Over 10 years, the total amount repaid will come to 127.5 million dollars. The repayment of the capital is not usually made in equal instalments. In the initial years, the repayment concerns mainly the interest, and the proportion of capital repaid increases over the years. In this case, if repayments are stopped, the capital still due is higher…

The nominal interest rate is the rate at which the loan is contracted. The real interest rate is the nominal rate reduced by the rate of inflation.
, unilateral trade liberalization and privatization of essential services - have led to lower growth rates and fewer improvements in social indicators than had occurred over the two decades between 1960 and 1980.

The IFIs owe an enormous social debt to countries whose public services have been damaged by their policies. Their creditors are the women of South countries, who have had to step in to provide the health care, the food, the teaching, the water, and the other basic goods and services put out of reach by IFI policies. The World Bank and the IMF should pay for free primary education and primary health care as a form of reparations or restitution for the damage their policies have caused.

As we take to the streets and plazas on September 14 to 20, in Singapore and around the world, we stand united in our call for an end to the destruction visited upon the South by the IMF, the World Bank, the other multilateral banks, and the countries that control them.

We call upon activists to tell us about their planned activities so that we may publicize them, and about the outcomes of their actions.

You may suscribe to this call, registering your organization, name of the related person, (Email/ phone/fax), and your mail adress to one of these contacts:

CADTM (secrétariat international), 345 Avenue de l’Observatoire, 4000 Liège, Belgique
Tel : (32) 4 226 62 85
www.cadtm.org email : virginie@cadtm.org

Jubilee South (secrétariat international), 49-B Mapagbigay Street, Central district, Quezon city, Philippines, Tel/fax: (63-2) 929-3134
www.jubileesouth.org email : secretariat@jubileesouth.org

Already joined the call :

GLOBAL

JUBILEE SOUTH
COMMITTEE FOR THE ABOLITION OF THE THIRD WORLD DEBT (CADTM)
WORLD FORUM OF FISH HARVESTRES AND FIHWORKERS, WFF
SOUTHERN PEOPLES ECOLOGICAL DEBT CREDITORS ALLIANCE (SPEDCA)
SUSTAINABILITY WATCH NETWORK

AFRICA Regionals

AFRICA JUBILEE SOUTH
SOUTHERN AFRICA PEOPLES SOLIDARITY NETWORK (SAPSN)
ALBERTINE RIFT CONSERVATION SOCIETY (ARCOS)

AMERICAS Regionals

JUBILEO SUR AMERICAS

ASIA/PACIFIC Regionals

JUBILEE SOUTH - ASIA/PACIFIC MOVEMENT ON DEBT AND DEVELOPMENT (JS-APMDD)
ASIA-PACIFIC FORUM ON WOMEN, LAW AND DEVELOPMENT (APWLD)

ASIA Regionals

FOCUS ON THE GLOBAL SOUTH - INDIA, THAILAND AND PHILIPPINES
ASIAN REGIONAL EXCHANGE FOR NEW ALTERNATIVES (ARENA)
INTERNATIONAL GENDER AND TRADE NETWORK - ASIA
MIGRANT FORUM IN ASIA (MFA)
ASIAN MIGRANT CENTRE (AMC)
NGO FORUM ON ADB
PEOPLES FORUM AGAINST ADB

EUROPE Regionals

WOMEN IN DEVELOPMENT EUROPE
CEE BANKWATCH NETWORK

SOUTH ASIA Sub-Regionals

SOUTH ASIA ALLIANCE FOR POVERTY ERADICATION (SAAPE)

ANGOLA

LIGA JUBILEU 2000 ANGOLA - LIJUA

ARGENTINA

DIALOGO 2000

AUSTRALIA

FRIENDS OF THE EARTH

AZERBAIJAN

CENTER FOR CIVIC INITIATIVES

BANGLADESH

COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT LIBRARY (CDL)
WARBE-Bangladesh
BANGLADESH SRAMAJIBI KENDRA (BSK)
UNNAYAN ONNESHAN-THE INNOVATORS (CENTRE FOR RESEARCH AND ACTION ON DEVELOPMENT)
DEPARTMENT OF DEVELOPMENT STUDIES, UNIVERSITY OF DHAKA, BANGLADESH
BANGLAPRAXIS
UTTARAN
PAANI COMMITTEE
HAMKURA RIVER ACTION COMMITTEE
AN ORGANIZATION FOR SOCIO-ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT (AOSED)
SAVE CHARA RIVER CAMPAIGN
BANGLADESH RIVERS NETWORK
LOKOJ INSTITUTE
BANGLADESH KRISHOK FEDERATION
KARMOJIBI NARI

BELGIUM

CENTRE NATIONAL DE COOPÉRATION AU DÉVELOPPEMENT (CNCD-11.11.11.)
ATTAC VLAANDEREN
PEUPLES SOLIDAIRES BELGIQUE
A CONTRE COURANT

BENIN

CADD
ASSOCIATION DES JEUNES POUR L’AIDE ET LE DEVELOPPEMENT

BRAZIL

JUBILEU BRAZIL
BRAZIL NETWORK ON INTERNATIONAL FINANCIAL INSTITUTIONS

CAMEROON

CENTRE FOR PROMOTION OF ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL ALTERNATIVES

CAMBODIA

PARTNERSHIP FOR DEVELOPMENT IN KAMPUCHEA (PADEK)
WOMYNS AGENDA FOR CHANGE

CANADA

HALIFAX INITIATIVE COALITION
BLUE PLANET PROJECT

CHILE

OBSERVATORIO LATINOAMERICANO DE CONFLICTOS AMBIENTALES - OLCA

COLOMBIA

UNION NACIONAL DE EMPLEADOS BANCARIOS DE COLOMBIA
FEDERACIÓN NACIONAL DE SINDICATOS BANCARIOS COLOMBIANOS
CAMPAÑA COLOMBIANA CONTRA LA DEUDA "EN DEUDA CON LOS DERECHOS

CONGO

FORUM SUR LA DETTE EXTÉRIEURE ET LE DÉVELOPPEMENT DU CONGO (FODEX)

CONGO BRAZZAVILLE

APASH

CUBA

CENTRO MEMORIAL DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING, JR. LA HABANA, CUBA

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

CONVERGENCIA DE MOVIMIENTOS DE LOS PUEBLOS DE LAS AMÉRICAS (COMPA)
COLECTIVO DE ORGANIZACIONES POPULARES

ECUADOR

ACCIÓN ECOLÓGICA
FUNDACIÓN MANÁ

FRANCE

ATTAC
ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONALE DE TECHNICIENS EXPERTS ET CHERCHEURS (AITEC)
INITIATIVES POUR UN AUTRE MONDE
LES AMIS DE LA TERRE
ECHANGEONS LE MONDE

GERMANY

BLUE 21
BERLINER LANDESARBEITSGEMEINSCHAFT UMWELT UND ENTWICKLUNG
BERLIN WORKING GROUP ON ENVIRONMENT AND DEVELOPMENT
ATTAC Germany

GUINEA CONAKRY

CECIDE

HAITI

PLATAFORMA DE POLÍTICAS DE DESARROLLO ALTERNATIVAS (PAPDA)

HONDURAS

CONSEJO CIVICO DE ORGANIZACIONES POPUALRES E INDÍGENAS DE HONDURAS (COPINH)

HONG KONG

HONG KONG CONFEDERATION OF TRADE UNIONS (HKCTU)
DOCUMENTATION FOR ACTION GROUPS IN ASIA (DAGA)
HONG KONG CHRISTIAN INDUSTRIAL COMMITTEE
ZI TENG

INDIA

INDIA SOCIAL ACTION FORUM (INSAF)
CENTRE FOR ORGANISATION, RESEARCH & EDUCATION (CORE)
RIVER BASIN FRIENDS
NATIONAL CONFEDERATION OF OFFICERS ASSOCIATIONS (NCOA)
NARMADA BACHAO ANDOLAN
NIMAR MALWA KISAN MAZDOOR SANGTHAN
PEOPLE’S DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION INDIA
CITIZEN’S CONCERN FOR DAMS AND DEVELOPMENT, MANIPUR (NE INDIA)
BHARAT GYAN VIGYAN SAMITI (BGVS)
URBAN RESEARCH CENTRE
TAMILNADU AGRICULTURAL LABOURERS MOVEMENT (TALM)
HUMAN RIGHTS- TAMILNADU INITIATIVE
VAK INDIA

INDONESIA

INTERNATIONAL NGO FORUM ON INDONESIAN DEVELOPMENT (INFID)
KOALISI ANTI UTANG (ANTI DEBT COALITION)
WORKING GROUP ON POWER SECTOR RESTRUCTURING (WGPSR)
JATAM - MINING ADVOCACY NETWORK
MIGRANT CARE
INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE INDONESIA
PERHIMPUNAN INDONESIA UNTUK BURUH MIGRAN BERDAULAT
INDONESIAN ASSOCIATION FOR SOVEREIGN MIGRANT WORKERS
SOLIDARITAS PEREMPUAN
LEMBAGA BANTUAN HUKUM (LBH) SEMARANG
INDONESIAN LEGAL AID FOUNDATION BRANCH OF SURABAYA
KOALISI RAKYAT UNTUK HAK ASTAS AIR (KRUHA)/PEOPLE’S COALITION FOR THE RIGHTS TO WATER

IRELAND

DEBT AND DEVELOPMENT COALITION

ITALY

LILA CEDIUS (ITALIAN LEAGUE FOR THE FIGHT AGAINST AIDS - CENTER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND PUBLIC HEALTH
ASSOCIAZIONE CULTURALE PUNTOROSSO
EQUIVITA, SCIENTIFIC COMMITTEE
CAMPAGNA DELLA RIFORMA DELLA BANCA MONDIALE (CRBM)

IVORY COAST

MARCHE MONDIALE DES FEMMES
FORUM NATIONAL SUR LA DETTE ET LA PAUVRETE

JAPAN

JUBILEE KYUSHU ON WORLD DEBT AND POVERTY
ATTAC Japan

KENYA

SOLIDARITY AFRICA NETWORK
KENYA DEBT RELIEF NETWORK (KENDREN)
DAUGHTERS OF MUMBI GLOBAL RESOURCE CENTER

MALI

COALITION DES ALTERNATIVES AFRICAINES DETTE ET DÉVELOPPEMENT (CAD-MALI)

MAURITANIA

MOUVEMENT POUR LES DROITS DE LA PERSONNE HUMAINE

MAURITIUS

MAURITIUS ACTION FOR DISAMAMENT AND PEACE

MEXICO

EDUCACIÒN PARA LA PAZ (CHIAPAS, MÉXICO) (MIEMBRO DE LA CAMPAÑA “SÌ A LA VIDA, NO A LAS IFIS”)

MOROCCO

ATTAC
REPORTERS SANS LIMITES

MOZAMBIQUE

ECONOMIC JUSTICE COALITION

NEPAL

RURAL RECONSTRUCTION NEPAL (RRN)
WATER AND ENERGY USERS’ FEDERATION
COLLECTIVE INITIATIVE FOR RESEARCH AND ACTION
ALL NEPAL WOMEN ASSOCIATION (ANWA)

NETHERLANDS

TRANSNATIONAL INSTITUTE (TNI)

NICARAGUA

CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS INTERNACIONALES

NIGER

RESEAU NATIONAL DETTE ET DEVELOPPEMENT (RNDD)
ONG ECO DÉVELOPPEMENT PARTICIPATIF (ONG-EDP)

NORWAY

INSTITUTE FOR GLOBAL NETWORKING, INFORMATION AND STUDIES (IGNIS)

PAKISTAN

PAKISTAN FISHERFOLK FORUM (PFF)
PAKISTAN INSTITUTE OF LABOUR EDUCATION & RESEARCH (PILER)
CREED ALLIANCE
PAKISTAN KISSAN RABITA COMMITTEE ( PAKISTAN PEASANTS COORDINATION COMMITTEE)
URBAN RESOURCE CENTRE
PEOPLE’S RIGHTS MOVEMENT (PRM)
VINCO DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION
PARTICIPATORY DEVELOPMENT INITIATIVES [PDI]
LABOUR EDUCATION FOUNDATION

PHILIPPINES

FREEDOM FROM DEBT COALITION
INTEGRATED RURAL DEVELOPMENT FOUNDATION
FOUNDATION FOR MEDIA ALTERNATIVES

PUERTO RICO

FAITH, ECONOMY AND SOCIETY PROGRAMME, LATIN AMERICAN COUNCIL OF CHURCHES (CLAI)

SENEGAL

FORUM FOR AFRICA ALTERNATIVES

SOUTH AFRICA

JUBILEE SOUTH AFRICA
ALTERNATIVE INFORMATION AND DEVELOPMENT CENTRE (AIDC)
SOUTHERN AFRICAN CENTRE FOR ECONOMIC JUSTICE
CENTRE FOR CIVIL SOCIETY ECONOMIC JUSTICE PROJECT, UNIVERSITY OF KWAZULU-NATAL, DURBAN, SOUTH AFRICA

SPAIN

ECOLOGISTAS EN ACCIÓN
CAMPAÑA ¿QUIÉN DEBE A QUIÉN? (CAMPAÑA CONTRA LA DEUDA EXTERNA Y POR LA RESTITUCIÓN DE LA DEUDA ECOLÓGICA)
PROYECTO PARA LA PARTICIPACION SOCIAL SOLIDARIDAD DIRECTA

SRI LANKA

MOVEMENT FOR NATIONAL LAND AND AGRICULTURAL REFORM (MONLAR)

SWITZERLAND

INSTITUTE FOR AGRICULTUTRE AND TRADE POLICY
CENTRE EUROPE TIERS MONDE (CETIM)

THAILAND

PSI-THAI AFFILIATES COUNCIL (PTAC)

UGANDA

AFRICAN WOMEN’S ECONOMIC POLICY NETWORK (AWEPON)

UK

WORLD DEVELOPMENT MOVEMENT (WDM)
CHRISTIAN AID (UK AND IRELAND)
JUBILEE DEBT CAMPAIGN

USA

JUBILEE USA NETWORK
50 YEARS IS ENOUGH NETWORK
TRANSNATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR GRASSROOTS RESEARCH AND ACTION (TIGRA)
THE OAKLAND INSTITUTE
AFRICA ACTION
CONGREGATION JUSTICE COMMITTEE, SISTERS OF THE HOLY CROSS
MOBILIZATION FOR GLOBAL JUSTICE
SOUTHWEST WORKERS UNION (SWU), SAN ANTONIO, TEXAS
THE DEVELOPMENT GAP
GENDER ACTION
NETWORK IN SOLIDARITY WITH THE PEOPLE OF GUATEMALA (NISGUA)
SOCIOLOGISTS WITHOUT BORDERS

ZIMBABWE

AFRICAN FORUM AND NETWORK ON DEBT AND DEVELOPMENT AFRODAD


Translation(s)

À venir

CADTM

COMMITTEE FOR THE ABOLITION OF ILLEGITIMATE DEBT

35 rue Fabry
4000 - Liège- Belgique

00324 226 62 85
info@cadtm.org

cadtm.org